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Cole Hamels Q&A with Leslie Gudel, Part I
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A lot has changed since Cole Hamels signed his six-year, $144 million contract extension with the Phillies on July 27, 2012.

He has a larger role in the clubhouse. He’s anchoring a pitching staff with Cliff Lee that has battled injuries to Roy Halladay, which has forced the former Cy Young winner to reinvent his style, Jonathan Pettibone and John Lannan.

The Phillies have a new (interim) manager in Ryne Sandberg after firing Charlie Manuel on Aug. 16. And Ruben Amaro Jr. has committed to a rebuild.

Not exactly how Hamels drew things up when he re-signed with the Phils.

Hamels recently sat down with Comcast SportsNet's Leslie Gudel to discuss his decision to re-sign with the Phillies, his new role with the team and Sandberg among other topics.

Here's Part I of the interview. Check back on Sunday for Part II:

Q. Describe this year

A. Humbling. I think just kind of in a sense of really trying to discover who you are, what type of teammate you want to become. Sort of a time where changes are obviously being made. It’s something where what place, you know, where do you want to be and where do you see yourself being a part of the team?

Q. Are you struggling with that role change?

A. I think it is. It’s something you have to discover if you’re capable of doing it. Being able to transfer it off so that others can believe it. Because if you do some sort of scenario or event that others partake in or notice, they just don’t think it’s something fake.

They have to buy into it. You really do have to believe in it and make them believe it and believe in you. Kind of knowing where your role is and fulfill your role of being a good teammate.

Q. As you've grown, have you taken a more active role as a good teammate?

A. Yeah, I think you have to know your place on the team, especially since I've come up, I've always been the young guy. First and foremost, I've wanted to have success on the field as a selfish quality that all of us have. But at the same time, you realize that the game is bigger than just one person and it takes a team to win a championship and it takes a whole team to get through a whole year.

And if you're going to be able to do it, you understand that people are watching and they are coming to watch everybody -- not just one person. That's something we want to attract and make more grand. That makes more people come in general.

Q. Since players have left, are you responsible for bringing the team back together?

A. Yeah, of course, because if you're not responsible, you're not being a good teammate. I think everyone has to buy into it. Along with everyone has to go out and give it best effort they can because they describe the game of baseball as being a long season, which really, when you look at it, it's pretty short. And it's a pretty short time you get to play the game, and you never want to look back and say 'Man, I wish I had one more game' because that's what people always talk about, no matter what the sport, they wish they could compete one more time.

They have to buy into the aspect that we have to compete every single day. Even if it's in batting practice, even if it's ing spring training getting ready for the season. You can't let one game go. Even when you're out of it, you're never really out of it. And that's the part that I think Ryno is trying to portray, and a lot of us -- especially the older guys -- because it is going to be over for a lot of us sooner than we think.

This is the best city to play baseball in, especially when you been able to experience what I have been able to experience. Obviously, a bunch of my teammates have been able to experience it. To come from nothing, building up a team, riding it out, winning the World Series, then going back again, then to not be able to do it again, you start to realize that was the most fun we've ever had. Let's get back to that.

Q. What did you learn the most from Manuel?

A. You have to have leadership. To keep the young guys, and even the old guys, in check because we are humans, and we do need to be kept in check. Keep the good with the bad. You have to know how to roll through it, how to progress to become better. You really do have to fight to the very end. That's kind of what we all had because we never experienced what it was like to win, we kept fighting and fighting and fighting to get to it.

And then, all of a sudden, you taste it and then you want to keep it. So I think, because things change over, any team goes through it, you have to rediscover who you are. The values of what you have, and what type of team you want to bring to the field every day.

Q. Are you a vocal leader?

A. There might be a balance, but truly, every team has to have a vocal leader and then everybody has to have a leader on the field. Because I don't play every day, I don't think I can be that guy out on the field, using that as my strength. I think because I'm in the dugout every day, because I'm in the outfield every day, doing the work with everyone that might play that day, that's more so a position I should be in.

Q. Do you regret your decision to come back here?

A. No, this is where I have become part of this team and part of the family that the ownership, you know David (Montgomery), they've welcomed me in with open arms. It's been the best experience ever, so you don't want to leave something that's that great. It's a tremendous organization to be a part of. When you get to see fans that are supporting you every day out on the streets, wearing jerseys, that's why you want to play the game.

They're the ones that want to see you play it, and you're the one that wants to put on the best show for them. It's having that sort of pride that you get to be a part of something special, and this is the city to be a a part of something special. I've grown very, I guess, comfortable knowing that this is the best thing that if you want to be a competitive athlete and you want to win, this is the best place to be.

Q. What gives you the most optimism for being a Phillie?

A. There's a lot of guys coming in just because of the fact of the rollover. That's always going to happen. When guys get older, you have to bring guys in to compete. You know, you have to try to win every year. You don't just try to settle, and that's why I like the organization. They don't try to settle.

They try to win every year, so it's nice to see some of the guys they've drafted and see what they bring to the table, and what they can offer to myself and what I can offer to them to be quality major leaguers that can help us win a World Series. And I think that's kind of fun, to see the new players coming up and seeing the excitement that they have and to build relationships on that. And it does, it rekindles that fire of what you felt when you were brought up. It brings back the good memories.